Yoga in Bhagavad Gita

The term Bhagavad Gita, means ‘The Eternal Song’ and is the very essence of ‘Mahabharata’ – an ancient Indian epic poem. It has 700 verses covered in 18 chapters. Each chapter is called ‘Yoga’ – the science of individual consciousness attaining communion with the Ultimate Consciousness. Each chapter is a highly specialized Yoga revealing the path of attaining realization with the Ultimate Truth. The first six chapters have been classified as the ‘Karma Yoga’ section – dealing with the science of attaining communion ‘through actions’. The next six are designated as ‘Bhakti Yoga’ section – attaining this communion travelling the ‘path of devotion’. The final six chapters are regarded as ‘Jnana Yoga’ section- the science of this communion ‘through the intellect’.

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Samkhya Philosophy – Theory of Yoga

Samkhya means ‘right knowledge’; it also means ‘numbers’. Samkhya is one of the oldest systems of Indian philosophy. It occupies a unique place among the six systems of Indian philosophy. Almost all branches of Indian literature reflect the influence of Samkhya Philosophy. This system is sometimes, described as the ‘atheistic Yoga’ as distinguished from Yoga Philosophy, which is also referred as ‘Theistic Samkhya. This system is accepted as the main opponent of Vedanta Philosophy which is a non-dualistic philosophy; whereas, Samkhya maintains a clear-cut dualism between Purusha (Pure Consciousness, soul) and Prakriti (nature, manifested being, mind-body complex); further maintains the plurality of Purusha, and is silent on God. It is often also referred as pluralistic spiritualism, an atheistic realism and uncompromising dualism.

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